Writing a WeekNum(…) function for Visio

I needed to display the week number of dates in a Visio project of mine, but there is no WeekNum(…) function built-in, so I had to write one, and allow for the date that the week numbers begin in to be varied from 1st January.  I also needed to allow for the week numbers to go backwards from the specified week number begin date.

Excel has a WeekNum(..) function, which can take an optional parameter for the day of the week to begin on, and an IsoWeekNum(..) function, and the following table shows the values change for the first 35 days of the year:

Excel Week Num Formulas

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Sorry about Brexit

In these days of political uncertainty in the UK, and our position in Europe or the world, there is only one thing that I can say: Sorry about Brexit … in every main language of the EU countries!

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Prototyping #Visio ShapeSheet Formulas in #Excel

I am working on an application where the horizontal axis of the Visio page represents dates from left to right. In fact, the each of the fixed horizontal grids are 1 day, and I need to have shapes that understand the begin date at the left edge of the shape, and the end date at the right edge of the shape. There is, therefore, a number of elapsed days representing by the width of the shape. However, the underlying grid can either represent all days, or it can be changed to only represent weekdays by omitting the weekends. I struggled to find the best formula to calculate the elapsed days or weekdays between two dates in Visio ShapeSheet formulas, so I turned to Excel to provide an inspiration. The Visio ShapeSheet is modelled on the Excel worksheet, and formulas can be entered into the cells in much the same way. However, the available functions differ since Excel is mainly used for arithmetic and statistics, but Visio is used for graphics and data. In this article, I demonstrate how I used C# and Excel to construct and test formulas for use in a Visio shape.

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Replacing Images in #Visio Shapes by Changing Data

I wrote an article last year about Swapping Images in a #Visio Shape manually, but I want to be able to do this whenever a Shape Data value changes. This is because I use I invariably use shapes linked to data. I also want to be able to have multiple images within a single grouped shape, and all of them changing when their referenced Shape Data values change. I believe that this will be more adaptable for a lot of scenarios than trying to repurpose Data Graphic Icon Sets ( see  Make Your Own Visio Data Graphic Icons Sets … automatically). I also discovered that the Shape.ChangePicture(…) function can just as easily work with urls as it can with network file paths, so even more possibilities are opened up! For example, the Visio Online JavaScript API has the ability to overlay an image (see ShapeView.addOverlay(…)).

So, I have created some macros to provide quick and easy selection, positioning and updating of images within a group shape.

personphotosbydata

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Support for the #Visio JavaScript API in #SharePoint Modern Framework, and more

It was the last day of the #MSIgnite conference today, and the video of the final presentation about Visio was worth staying for, even though some of it was content I knew about, and have mentioned in previous posts this week ( see Dive into the world of data-driven operation intelligence with Microsoft Visio, Excel and Power BI). However, there was some content I was particularly pleased to see, and that was about support for the Visio Online JavaScript API support in Modern SharePoint Framework. I have pulled out some of the key slides below, but check out the full session for more information.

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The hardworking Microsoft Visio product development team have worked hard to almost match all of the functionality of the old server-side Visio services control, but they haven’t quite got everything. So I cheered when I hear that support for html overlays are in the roadmap to be supported! All I ask for now (almost) is layer control, and I will be very happy.

They also stated that they will be enabling all this functionality for non-SharePoint web sites in the future!

Go to http://aka.ms/voapireference got more details.

 

#Visio Roadmap @ #MSIgnite 2018

The first slot of the day at the furthest away room from the main conference area is not the ideal time to present anything, but those attendees that made it saw how many new features have been added to Visio recently, and what is soon to be added. The session recording should be available soon, but for those who can’t wait, here is a spoiler! ( View the session here )

VisioRoadmap2018

Recent released features:

  • Visio Online
  • PowerPoint Slide Snippets
  • Data Visualizer
  • Visio Visual in Power BI
  • Microsoft Teams integration
  • Data Visualizer bi-directional links
  • Export to Word

Released at Ignite:

  • Cross-functional flowcharts in Visio Online
  • New Azure Stencils in Visio Online

Soon to be released:

  • UML diagrams and Wireframes in Visio Online
  • Microsoft Flow integration
  • Collaboration enhancements
  • Data Visualizer diagrams in Excel
  • Data-driven Org. Charts, Timelines, Roadmaps
  • Visio immersive
  • Surface Hub integration

Well, that should keep me busy for a while. Now, who wants to give me a project that requires a mixed-reality headset?

 

Using #SharePoint Links and Hyperlinks in #Visio

A current project of mine has caused me to look more closely at the use of links and hyperlinks in “modern” SharePoint Online libraries. Every “modern” SharePoint Online library gets the option to create a new Link in addition to any other content types. They are InternetShortcut files with a .url extension. Only the filename is easily editable once created because the target url is within the file, and no editor is provided. However, it does provide a method to create a repository of approved urls. The alternative approach is to create a column of Hyperlink type, which can be edited easily. This article looks at the implications of each when used in SharePoint Online and used within an external data recordset in Visio, with the intention of providing shapes with hyperlinks.

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